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Types of Paint

Discussion in 'Early Jeep Restoration and Research' started by Gump, Jun 9, 2005.

  1. Jun 9, 2005
    Gump

    Gump Old Timer

    Bethel, CT
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    Jun 1, 2004
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    236
    I saw in Hemmings they did a great job of discussing all the different types of paint. I was just wondering what everybody used that painted their own at home or in their driveway or garage. I looks like lacquer is the easiest and fastest drying but does it stand up?
     
  2. Jun 9, 2005
    Glenn

    Glenn Kinda grumpy old man Staff Member

    Apopka, Fl
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    I use acrylic enamel. I've never tried anything else so can't comment on it.
     
  3. Jun 9, 2005
    blevisay

    blevisay Oh Noooooooooooooooo! Staff Member

    Portland Tn.
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    PPG Omni single stage poly here. I am not happy with the quality of the paint.

    But I would say the lacquer or acrylic will be the most forgiving to a home painter.
     
  4. Jun 9, 2005
    digger

    digger Can only wish

    Gainesville, Texas
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    May 4, 2005
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    Acrylic Enamel here also. I purchased Nason brand made by Dupont at the local O'riellys auto parts store. It was very reasonably priced and covered very well.
     
  5. Jun 10, 2005
    Gump

    Gump Old Timer

    Bethel, CT
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    Thanks for the replys. I think Hemmings said the acrylic enamel was 2nd for the home painter and would stand up better than lacquer.
     
  6. Jun 10, 2005
    timgr

    timgr We stand on the shoulders of giants. 2022 Sponsor

    Medford Mass USA
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    Billy's comment is the first negative about the PPG Omni. I haven't used it, but several sources (Carey at IFSJA, JPE, others I can't think of) have said it's good for the money. I'd guess it's a safe bet for solid colors. I'd be interested to hear more from Billy, since I was planning to use it on my truck.
     
  7. Jun 10, 2005
    SIDSCJ

    SIDSCJ Jeep addict

    14th State
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    Not sure if you can still get lacquer paint. 12 years ago I worked for a PBE jobber and lacquer was being phased out due to its high VOC content. Single stage acrylic enamel is easy to use with a solid color, metallics are harder as they're suspended in the color coat. I'd use a hardner in acrylic enamel for better gloss retention and durability. Single stage urethane is even better, but the additives are poisonous. Not recommended for use with your basic charcoal respirator, they won't filter out the isocyanates. Talk to your paint gut at the store and be sure to get the right reducer for the anticipated temperature when you paint. Too fast a reducer will flash off too quickly and leave you with a nice "orange peel " finish. Very hard to sand and buff out if you use a hardener. HTH
     
  8. Jun 10, 2005
    timgr

    timgr We stand on the shoulders of giants. 2022 Sponsor

    Medford Mass USA
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    No experience here, but a little research.

    AFAIK both acrylic enamel and urethanes use the same hardener - isocyanate (IC). IC is a cyanide compound that combines chemically with the paint to harden it. AE can be used without hardener, but will give inferior results.

    Masks specifically designed for painters will filter out IC. There is some danger from getting the IC paint on your skin or in your eyes though. A pressurized air setup is best, though there are plenty of painters that use a respirator, tyvek suit, gloves and mask. <edit> and eye protection. A full face mask might be better, but is significantly more expensive than the good, disposable 3M respirators.

    Different people react differently to IC. Some have no reaction, some are sensitive. Some become sensitized, and any exposure then causes symptoms like asthma.

    From the Australian National Occupational Health and Safety Commission's website:

    POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECTS FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO ISOCYANATES

    Route of Entry into the Body

    The route of isocyanate entry into the body is through inhalation and percutaneous
    (skin) absorption.

    Acute
    (rapid) and Chronic (long term) Effects

    Health effects may follow acute or chronic exposure to isocyanates. Isocyanates can cause respiratory sensitisation and lead to occupational asthma. Isocyanate splashes in the eyes can cause severe chemical conjunctivitis
    (irritation of the membranes around the eye). Isocyanates are also mild skin irritants and can cause dermatitis (irritation of the skin). Sensitisation of the skin may occur, but this is not common. 4,4'Di-isocyanate dicyclohexyl methane is an exception, being a potent skin sensitiser.

    In sufficiently high concentrations in the air, isocyanates have a primary irritant effect on the respiratory tract.

    Sensitised workers may exhibit asthmatic symptoms when subsequently exposed to atmospheric concentrations well below the exposure standard. Exposure of sensitised workers may initiate reduction in respiratory capacity immediately on exposure, some hours later or both. There is evidence that for sensitised workers, recurrent exposures may result in impairment of ventilatory function and poor recovery.

    Other health effects may include liver and kidney dysfunction
    (failure). Interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (scarring of the lung) has been reported as a long-term hazard.
     
  9. Jun 12, 2005
    Aquadog

    Aquadog New Member

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    Over the years I have used both, and have also used straight enamel. Like said previously, lacquer is being phased out. Color selection can be very limited. Lacquer and acrylic enamel are two different animals. Yes lacquer stands up. GM used it for decades. It is not a high build paint, goes on thin but needs polishing when cured. Acrylic enamel would be great choice. Unlimited color selection, and very forgiving. The overspray makes a mess, though. Good luck with your painting project!
     
  10. Jun 13, 2005
    Gump

    Gump Old Timer

    Bethel, CT
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    Jun 1, 2004
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    Acrylic Enamel it is. Thanks a lot.

    I was looking at building a "paint booth" out of PVC pipe & plastic just to keep stuff from dropping in. Nothing fancy, just a cheap throw away.
     
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